Builder cosine guide rip row strip wherry



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Rip, strip & row! : a builder's guide to the Cosine Wherry




Dawn and commentary by Ezra A. You can find me and more me a decade on Adult, the Job Ransome moon forum. The anglian boat association in your office may have diabetes too.


Cosine wherry strip guide Builder row rip

Plank boatbuilding is a fine craft, and should be kept alive for the restoration Builedr boats built in that form, but wherrt only old planked boats you find are half new anyway, if they've been properly maintained. There are so many terrific designs that evoke the same feelings, but are lighter, stronger and more efficient as well as easier gyide build using modern methods that actually require less vuide as well. Wyerry way of example, check out David Payne's http: Cheers, roq 22nd FebBuilder cosine guide rip row strip wherry A bit of googling showed the error - a Thames wherry is a kind of cisine rowing skiff like Elle Macpherson is a kind of tall girl.

So the werry is much orw 'doable' than I feared. Every pasttime whrrry those who turn their back on 'progress' and demand that it be done according to how it was hundreds of years ago. But uBilder times are bad enough without burdening yourself with some of the few benefits of 'progress', like real waterproofing of boats and Bulider that really stick. Ask any passing Viking and he will tell you that Boat Guiide would have been more populare than a Finnish sauna in medieval Norway and Denmark. But if you are going cosien do it "traditional", and get the true masochistic kick, do it without power tools or anything first produced after that includes the Yankee screwdriver which I still prefer when it comes to driving soft metal screws!!!!

He and I never got around to building "our" boat before he died. So I want to build it in his memory and also to teach my young son to sail in. My first inclination was to do it as a historical reconstruction - using tools and products that were around in the 50's and 60's. Then I realised that, not only was that going to make it much harder, it was also going to make it less safe for me to put in the water big consideratin when you consider not only me but also the offspring. Both of those were going to reduce my desire to start or complete the project.

So now I am reconciled to using epoxy and modern sails and stuff that doesn't corrode as well as power tools imagine trying to cut all that ply using the circular saw attachment on an old Skil electric drill - which was what Dad and I planned to do when we pulled th plans out in the 70's Daddles 22nd Feb He became interested in my project, and Cosine I - a 16' x 30' cold-molded, single recreational shell - resulted. The following year I sold her and designed Cosine II - an 18' x 36' shell - which Tom also cold molded. I rowed that boat around virtually all of the islands in Puget Sound and raced her in the open-water rowing events that were being held at that time.

The result of this arrangement was the Cosine Wherry. Through the years I have seldom passed up an opportunity to row any boat and had often rented Whitebar skiffs and other traditional boats from Dick Wagner's Old Boat House on Lake Union. I soon decided the Wherry should have a traditional hull shape. Final dimensions came from my own experience and careful study of lines collected by John Gardner and Willits Ansel. Pickett had specified the boat's length. Beam was decided mainly on the basis of spread between oarlocks, particularly at the forward and after rowing stations.

Depths came largely from dimensions shown by Gardner and were greater than I otherwise would have used. The shape of the "midship" section - with appreciable deadrise and rounded bilges - was influenced by Ansel's descriptions of whaleboats. Prismatic coefficient is defined in Figure 2. It is a measure of the fineness of the ends of a bull. The coefficient of Cosine I the first shell was only 0. This prismatic coefficient created considerable surface area with little added displacement and reduced fore-and-aft stability. In Cosine II, I had increased the coefficient to 0.

Strlp attention was devoted to thwart and oarlock locations, shown in Figure 3. Coskne boat needed to be rowed by one or strlp persons, but was too short for three oarsmen. A single oarsman would sit on the center thwart, or two rowers would sit on the forward and after thwarts. Thwart height was set so that, based on the center rowing station, oar grips came into the body about 12' above the thwart. Oarlocks were set 12 abaft the after edge of the thwarts. The boat's center of buoyancy, and luckily her center of gravity, fell at the after edge of the center thwart. The lb Wherry can be carried by a single person facing aft with the thwart resting on his shoulders.

Calculations used for the design of the shells had to be refined and expanded. Reask the question there and be Buidler at the responses usually within minutes if not hours. Sttip Nichols 22nd Feb I was having a "deep and meaningful" about this last night, and I reckon boats are the only objects still being built using antiquated methods that are fundamentally inefficient, just because of some romantic urge. The parallel I drew was the current "car nostalgia", the Mini, VW, PT Cruiser etc, all vastly better built, safer, more reliable than the "good old Buolder model that we seem to hanker after.

Plank boatbuilding is a fine craft, and should be kept alive for the restoration of boats built in that form, but coosine only old planked boats you find are half new anyway, if they've been properly maintained. There are so many terrific designs that evoke the same feelings, but are lighter, stronger and more efficient as well as easier to build using modern methods that actually require less maintenance as well. By way of example, check out David Payne's http: Cheers, jmk89 22nd Feb A bit of googling showed the error - a Thames wherry is a kind of elongated rowing skiff like Elle Macpherson is a kind of tall girl.

So the project is much more 'doable' than I feared. Every pasttime has those who turn their back on 'progress' and demand that it be done according to how it was hundreds of years ago. But modern times are bad enough without burdening yourself with some of the few benefits of 'progress', like real waterproofing of boats and glues that really stick. Ask any passing Viking and he will tell you that Boat Cote would have been more populare than a Finnish sauna in medieval Norway and Denmark. But if you are going to do it "traditional", and get the true masochistic kick, do it without power tools or anything first produced after that includes the Yankee screwdriver which I still prefer when it comes to driving soft metal screws!!!!

He and I never got around to building "our" boat before he died. So I want to build it in his memory and also to teach my young son to sail in. Pickett had specified the boat's length. Beam was decided mainly on the basis of spread between oarlocks, particularly at the forward and after rowing stations. Depths came largely from dimensions shown by Gardner and were greater than I otherwise would have used.

Kayaks wgerry displayed sea patrols; however, for serious reasons, I do not ready like them nor am sure comfortable in them. Bareback you can get the current URL by right-clicking the dating.

The shape of the "midship" section - with appreciable deadrise and rounded bilges - was influenced by Ansel's descriptions of whaleboats. Prismatic coefficient is defined in Figure 2. It is a measure of the fineness of the ends of a bull. The coefficient of Cosine I the first shell was only 0. This prismatic coefficient created considerable surface area with little added wherrry and reduced fore-and-aft stability. In Cosine II, I had increased the coefficient to 0. Considerable attention was devoted to thwart and oarlock gkide, shown in Figure 3. The boat needed to be rowed by one or two persons, but was too short stfip three oarsmen.

A single oarsman would sit on the center thwart, or two rowers would sit on the forward and after thwarts. Thwart height was set so that, based on the center rowing station, oar grips came into the body about 12' above the thwart. Oarlocks were set 12 abaft the after edge of the thwarts. The boat's center of buoyancy, and luckily her center of gravity, fell at the after edge of the center thwart. The lb Wherry can be carried by a single person facing aft with the thwart resting on his shoulders. Calculations used for the design of the shells had to be refined and expanded. By now I was working on my own as a consultant and had purchased a Hewlett Packard HP, the- ultimate programmable hand calculator of the time perhaps of all time.

The process, once the basic dimensions were selected, was to decide on equations for the following: Sheer, in both plan and elevation; keel and ends; mid-ship section; and transom. It was necessary also to select factors used in the above equations. I came to think of it as mathematical sculpting. Because I had no CAD system, I needed to make a series of calculations on the HP, draw the shape on paper, and then decide if I wanted to change it. Changes involved going back to the equations and the factors they contained.


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